Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Bolton Priory, North Yorkshire, England, UK

Bolton Abbey is an estate in Wharfedale in North Yorkshire, England, which takes its name from the ruined 12th-century Augustinian monastery now generally known as Bolton Priory. It is adjacent to the village of Bolton Abbey.

The monastery was originally founded at Embsay in 1120. Led by a prior, Bolton Abbey was technically a priory, despite its name. It was founded in 1154 by the Augustinian order, on the banks of the River Wharfe.
The land at Bolton, as well as other resources, were given to the order by Lady Alice de Romille of Skipton Castle in 1154.
In the early 14th century Scottish raiders caused the temporary abandonment of the site and serious structural damage to the priory.
The seal of the priory featured the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Child and the phrase sigillum sancte Marie de Bolton.
The nave of the abbey church was in use as a parish church from about 1170 onwards, and survived the Dissolution of the Monasteries.
Building work was still going on at the abbey when the Dissolution of the Monasteries resulted in the termination of the priory in 1539. The east end remains in ruins.
A tower, begun in 1520, was left half-standing, and its base was later given a bell-turret and converted into an entrance porch. Most of the remaining church is in the Gothic style of architecture, but more work was done in the Victorian era, including windows by August Pugin.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Prague, Czech Republic

Prague (/ˈprɑːɡ/; Czech: Praha pronounced [ˈpraɦa] ) is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. It is the fourteenth-largest city in the European Union.

It is also the historical capital of Bohemia proper. Situated in the north-west of the country on the Vltava River, the city is home to about 1.3 million people, while its larger urban zone is estimated to have a population of nearly 2 million.
The city has a temperate oceanic climate, with warm summers and chilly winters.
Prague has been a political, cultural, and economic centre of central Europe with waxing and waning fortunes during its 1,100-year existence. Founded during the Romanesque and flourishing by the Gothic and Renaissance eras, Prague was not only the capital of the Czech state, but also the seat of two Holy Roman Emperors and thus also the capital of the Holy Roman Empire.
It was an important city to the Habsburg Monarchy and its Austro-Hungarian Empire and after World War I became the capital of Czechoslovakia. The city played major roles in the Protestant Reformation, the Thirty Years' War, and in 20th-century history, during both World Wars and the post-war Communist era.
Prague is home to a number of famous cultural attractions, many of which survived the violence and destruction of 20th-century Europe.
Main attractions include the Prague Castle, the Charles Bridge, Old Town Square, the Jewish Quarter, the Lennon Wall, and Petřín hill. Since 1992, the extensive historic centre of Prague has been included in the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.
The city boasts more than ten major museums, along with numerous theatres, galleries, cinemas, and other historical exhibits.
A modern public transportation system connects the city. Also, it is home to a wide range of public and private schools, including Charles University.
Prague is classified as a Beta+ global city according to GaWC studies, comparable to Berlin, Rome, or Houston.
Its rich history makes it a popular tourist destination, and the city receives more than 4.1 million international visitors annually, as of 2009. In 2011, Prague was the sixth-most-visited city in Europe.

Friday, July 26, 2013

Crete: Incredible Beaches



Official Crete Region Promotional Video 2013

For more information on using Crete for your next production, visit the official Crete tourism portals:
www.incrediblecrete.gr 
www.twitter.com/incrediblecrete
www.facebook.com/incrediblecrete
www.scoop.it/t/incrediblecrete

Directed by Theo Papadoulakis, IndigoView Productions 
Edited by George Pada
www.indigoview.com


"A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step." -- Lao Tzu Copyright © Demetrios the Traveler

Northwestern Greece from space


Northwestern Greece, originally uploaded by europeanspaceagency.

The northwestern part of Greece is pictured in this image acquired on 28 April by the Landsat-8 satellite. The Ionian Sea dominates the left side of the image, with the Ambracian Gulf near the centre. In the upper-left corner we can see the Paxi islands. Paxos, to the north, boasts beautiful beaches mainly along its eastern coast, with dramatic cliffs and caves dominating the west side. The smaller island to the south, Antipaxos, is also known for its beaches as well as its traditional vineyards.

This image is featured on the Earth from space programme: spaceinvideos.esa.int/Videos/2013/07/Earth_from_Space_Pea...

Credit: USGS

Monday, July 8, 2013

Richtis Gorge (Greek: Φαράγγι του Ρίχτη) Crete, Greece


Richtis, originally uploaded by macropoulos.

Richtis Gorge (Greek: Φαράγγι του Ρίχτη, Faraggi tou Richti) refers to a gorge in Crete, Greece (Map of Richtis Gorge here). It is a state protected park near Exo Mouliana, Sitia, eastern Crete (Greece) that starts at the traditional village Exo Mouliana, which is located on the national road between Agios Nikolaos and Sitia and ends at the secluded Richtis beach, just east of the village Kalavros. The hiking trail is about 4 km in length of easy (spring/summer/autumn) to moderate (winter) difficulty. Rich vegetation (mainly platanus trees, wild berries and local flowers and herbs) and animal life (mainly local species of butterflies, small reptiles, birds and small mammals) can be observed along the way, as well as old stone bridges and water mills before it culminates with the Richtis Waterfall and beach, making Richtis gorge trail one of the most diversified hiking experiences in Crete

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