Friday, February 19, 2010

river lake havasu, Arizona USA


The abundance of dams along the Colorado River creates a number of large lakes in arid, regions of the Southwest where large, natural bodies of water are nonexistent. These lakes provide unique recreational opportunities and offer an exceptional contrast to the scenic desert landscapes that surround them.
One of the most popular and interesting lakes along the Colorado River is Lake Havasu, well-known for one particular historic point of interest, the London Bridge. The London Bridge is one of the main attractions at Lake Havasu that sets it apart from other desert playgrounds.
More than 2.5 million visitors flock each year to shores of Lake Havasu to enjoy the scenery, the cool waters of the lake and abundant recreational activities. Water sports, hiking, off-road opportunities and cultural and natural history are some of the attractions that draw visitors year round.



"A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step." -- Lao Tzu
Copyright © Demetrios the Traveler



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Friday, February 12, 2010

Alaska ...ice and forests


"A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step." -- Lao Tzu
Copyright © Demetrios the Traveler



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Wednesday, February 10, 2010

Space Shuttle Endeavour Lifts Off!

Editor's Note: Hi Flickr friends! This is a slight departure from what I usually post, since this is a shuttle image. But as I was blessed enough to witness this launch in person -- my first launch! -- I wanted you to see what I saw. Please note that these incredible NASA images are not mine personally. I urge you to see the whole set at mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=4.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Endeavour lights up the night sky as it lifts off Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Launch on the STS-130 mission to the International Space Station was at 4:14 a.m. EST. This was the second launch attempt for space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 crew and the final scheduled space shuttle night launch. The first attempt on Feb. 7 was scrubbed due to unfavorable weather. The primary payload for the STS-130 mission to the International Space Station is the Tranquility node, a pressurized module that will provide additional room for crew members and many of the station's life support and environmental control systems. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work area with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. The multi-directional view will allow the crew to monitor spacewalks and docking operations, as well as provide a spectacular view of Earth and other celestial objects. The module was built in Turin, Italy, by Thales Alenia Space for the European Space Agency.

For information on the STS-130 mission and crew, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts130....

Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

Uploaded by nasa1fan/MSFC on 10 Feb 10, 4.31AM EET.


"A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step." -- Lao Tzu
Copyright © Demetrios the Traveler



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Monday, February 8, 2010

The Entrance to The Enid A Haupt Conservatory, NYC, USA

The largest Victorian glasshouse in the United States, the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, opened in 1902 and was named a New York City Landmark in 1973. Permanent exhibits include tropical rain forests, deserts, and the world's most comprehensive collection of palm trees under glass. The Conservatory also houses temporary and seasonal flowers shows such as the Orchid Show and the Holiday Train Show.


"A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step." -- Lao Tzu
Copyright © Demetrios the Traveler



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Chateau Frontenac Quebec City


Chateau Frontenac Quebec City, originally uploaded by DenaP.

The Château Frontenac grand hotel is a popular attraction in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada.
It was designed by architect Bruce Price, the Château Frontenac was one of a series of "château" style hotels built for the Canadian Pacific Railway company at the end of the 19th and the start of the 20th century. It opened in 1893, five years after its sister-hotel the Banff Springs. The railway company sought to encourage luxury tourism and bring wealthy travelers to its trains.
The Château Frontenac was named in honour of Louis de Buade, Count of Frontenac, who was governor of the colony of New France from 1672 to 1682 and 1689 to 1698. The Château was built not too far from the historic Citadelle, whose construction Frontenac had begun at the end of the 17th century. The Quebec Conference of 1943, at which Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt discussed strategy for the Second World War, was held at the Citadelle while much of the staff stayed nearby in the Château Frontenac.
Although several of Quebec City's buildings stand taller, the hotel is perched atop a tall cape overlooking the Saint Lawrence River, thus giving a spectacular view for several kilometres. The building is the most prominent feature of the Quebec City skyline as seen from across the St. Lawrence, and is a symbol of the city. The hotel is built near the Plains of Abraham.
The hotel is managed and operated by Fairmont Hotels and Resorts of Toronto, a firm that manages numerous prestigious hotels around the world. The hotel was sold by Fairmont on October 31, 2000 to the Legacy Hotels REIT for CAD $185 million. However, Fairmont has a long-term management agreement with Legacy Hotels, and as of August 2005, held an 11.14% ownership in the REIT.[citation needed]
In 1953 this hotel was used as filming location for the Alfred Hitchcock's drama I Confess, with Montgomery Clift and Ann Baxter as main stars.
Prior to the building of the hotel, the site was home to the Chateau Haldimand, residence of the British colonial governors of Quebec/Lower Canada.
It holds the Guinness World Record of "The most photographed hotel in the world".



"A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step." -- Lao Tzu
Copyright © Demetrios the Traveler



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Saturday, February 6, 2010

Beckovský hrad, Beckov Slovakia



Beckovský hrad, originally uploaded by Klearchos Kapoutsis.

Beckov Castle (Slovak: Beckovský hrad or Beckov) is a castle in ruins located near the village of Beckov in Nové Mesto nad Váhom District, Trenčín Region, western Slovakia.
It is a natural cultural monument and its present appearance is the result of renovations in the last quarter of the 20th century and since 2002.
The Beckov Cliff at the Váh River was used as a strategic outpost in the Great Moravia, when a fortification was built on it. A stone castle was built there to protect the borders of the Kingdom of Hungary, probably in the middle of the 13th century.
The castle became property of Matthew Csák at the turn of the 13th and 14th centuries and was fortified under his rule. After his death in 1321, the castle was administered by castellans. Louis I of Hungary gave the castle to Miklós Bánffy in 1379 as a reward for his service in battles in the Balkans and Italy.
In 1388, the castle was given to Stibor of Stiboricz, a knight of Polish origins, by Sigismund, King of Hungary. Stibor was one of the king's most influential advisors, and he rebuilt the castle into his family seat in the Gothic style. Stibor also built a chapel with splendid sculpture decorations and paintings.
After his death in 1414, the castle was inherited by his son, Stibor II. Because Stibor II did not have a son, he bequeathed the property to his daughter Katarína (Katherine). However, the royal council decided that she would receive only the customary one fourth of her father's property paid out in cash.
The castle was given to Pál Bánffy by Sigismund in 1437, one day before Sigismund's death, probably under the condition that he would marry Katarína, which was fulfilled.
After the Battle of Mohács in 1526, where the Kingdom of Hungary was defeated by the Ottoman Empire, the Bánffy family rebuilt the castle into a Renaissance fortress and noble seat. One of the Bánffys, János Bánffy, was killed fighting against the Turks in 1595. The castle was successfully defended against a Tatar siege in 1599. The Bánffy family owned the castle until 1646, when its last member, Kristóf Bánffy, died.
The castle was gradually turned into a prison and barracks. In 1729, a fire destroyed the interior and roofs of the castle and turned it into ruins.
The castle was proclaimed a national cultural monument in 1970. Its present appearance is the result of renovation in the last quarter of the 20th century.
"A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step." -- Lao Tzu
Copyright © Demetrios the Traveler



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